Paola PIVI
“ ? ”, 2013
urethane foam, plastic, feathers
115 x 148 x 111 cm / 45,3 x 58,3 x 43,7 inches
photograph by Guillaume Ziccarelli
Courtesy Galerie Perrotin

Galerie Perrotin is inaugurating its New York space with an exhibition by the audacious and playful Italian artist Paola Pivi

Nomadic by nature, Paola Pivi has lived all over the world, including Shanghai, the remote island of Alicudi in southern Italy, and Anchorage, Alaska. She is presently in India. Pivi first exhibited at Viafarini in Milan in 1995, the same year she enrolled in the Brera Academy of Art in Milan. In 1999, she was co-awarded the Golden Lion for the best national pavilion (Italy) at Harald Szeemann’s Venice Biennial. For this venue, which featured five Italian artists, Pivi presented “Untitled (airplane)”, an inverted Fiat G-91 airplane resting on its cockpit. Last year, the artist was commissioned two original public artworks in New York City: “How I roll”, a project by Public Art Fund, a Piper Seneca airplane rotated on its wingtips, installed near Central Park at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, and “Untitled (zebras)”, a striking image of zebras on a snow-covered mountaintop on the 25-by-75-foot High Line Billboard at West 18th Street.

Paola Pivi “ok, you are better than me, so what?” will open at Galerie Perrotin, New York, on September 18th. The show will run through October 26, 2013. Galerie Perrotin’s New York space is located at 909 Madison Avenue. 

Theta-Two, 1965
Lacquer, fiberglass, and plywood
21 x 22 x 7 ½ inches (53.3 x 55.9 x 19.1 cm)
© The Estate of John McCracken
Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London
 

An exhibition of works by John McCracken (1934-2011) is opening at David Zwirner’s 537 West 20th Street location on Tuesday, September 10th. Drawn primarily from public and private collections, the exhibition will include both well-known and lesser-seen examples of McCracken’s production from the early 1960s up through his death in 2011. In addition to presenting a range of the artist’s sculptures, a number of his paintings and sketches will be on view in an effort to fully contextualize and demonstrate the wide-ranging breadth of his practice.

McCracken occupies a singular position within the recent history of American art, as his work melds the restrained formal qualities of Minimalist sculpture with a distinctly West Coast sensibility expressed through color, form, and surface. Viewed in their totality, the works in this exhibition will present a vocabulary of forms and pinpoint specific tendencies in McCracken’s practice, exploring in particular concepts of spatiality and his relationship to architecture.

The opening of the exhibition will be held on Tuesday, September 10, from 6-8pm at 537 West 20th Street, New York. 

Photo by EPW Studio/Maris Hutchinson. Courtesy of the artist, Maccarone New York, and David Zwirner New York/London
 

On September 7th Carol Bove will open "RA, or Why is an orange like a bell?“, the artist’s second solo exhibition with Maccarone Gallery in the West Village of Manhattan, on view through October 19th, 2013.   

The show will feature Bove’s newest body of sculptural works inhabiting both maccarone’s morton street and greenwich street spaces.  Many of these works are similar to Bove’s most recent outdoor sculptural tableaus comprised of various metals and concrete, and will for the first time be brought into an interior gallery setting. Bove will interweave relics and ephemera from the archive of Lionel Ziprin - a legendary NYC beat poet and scholar -  thereby incorporating a realm for research and study within the traditional gallery show context, offering a metonymic viewing experience and insight into Bove’s artistic practice on the whole.

Maccarone Gallery is located at 630 Greenwich Street, New York City. 

Adeline de Monseignat
The Body (aka The Eclair), 2013
Vintage fur, hand-blown glass, pillow filler, sika block, fabric and buttons
69 ¾ x 15 x 17 3/8 in
177.2 x 38.1 x 44.1 cm
 

Adeline de Monseignat (b. 1987, Monaco)

Adeline de Monseignat lives and works in London. Themes around the body, fertility, sexuality and origin are recurrent in her’s practice, often dealt in her sculptures and installations with organic, sensual and fragile materials such as fur, coffee, eggshells, and wood, in order to let these materials do what the body itself does: yield to the damages of time.  With influences such as Meret Oppenheim, Louise Bourgeois, Eva Hesse and Gabriel Orozco, her work falls into a genre of sculpture known as ‘soft sculpture’. (via the artist's statement)

Monseignat received her MA in Fine Art with Distinction from City & Guilds of London Art School. Following her graduation, she has begun showing her work in the UK, America and Berlin. She recently completed a residency at Pioneer Works in Redhook, Brooklyn, and participated in a group exhibition titled Dead Inside at Bleecker Street Arts Club. Currently, her works are on view at Gerson Zevi in London as part of the exhibition The London Project, which will be on view through November 1, 2013.

Installation view from Platform: Josephine Meckseper  July 4 to October 14 2013
© Josephine Meckseper
Image courtesy of Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York
The works are not for sale. For availability of Meckseper
works please inquire directly with the gallery.

Josephine Meckseper (b. 1964, German)

Josephine Meckseper has developed a practice that melds the aesthetic language of modernism with a profound critique of consumerism. In her signature shop window displays, large scale sculptures, installations, paintings, photographs, and films she draws a direct correlation to the wayconsumer culture defines and circumvents the key instruments of individual political agency. Meckseper received her MFA from the California Institute of Arts (1992). Her works have been exhibited at and are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum amongst other major institutions and have been included in numerous museum exhibitions and international biennials. Monographs on Meckseper’s work have been published by Hatje Cantz and JRP Ringier, on the occasion of her solo exhibitions at the KunstmuseumStuttgart and the Migros museum. Her recent public sculpture Manhattan Oil Project was commissioned by the Art Production Fund.

The artist’s work is currently on view at the Parrish Art Museum, as well as at the Fireplace Project in East Hampton. Josephine Meckseper will also have an exhibition at the Andrea Rosen Gallery opening in November 2013. 

Ken Price (American, 1935–2012)
Pastel
1995
Fired and painted clay
14 ½ x 15 x 14 in.
James Corcoran Gallery
© Ken Price, photo © Fredrik Nilsen 

Los Angeles-based artist Ken Price’s innovative works helped redefine contemporary sculpture as they advanced the medium of clay well beyond its traditional roles.  Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective at The Metropolitan Museum of Art—a long overdue major exhibition showcasing the artist’s unique and groundbreaking approach to sculpture—is the first museum retrospective of the artist’s work in New York. The exhibition assembles 62 sculptures dating from 1959-2012 along with 11 late works on paper - allowing exhibitions viewers the ability to grasp the full range of Price’s innovative work. 

Born in Los Angeles, Ken Price received his BFA from the University of Southern California in 1956 and his MFA from the famed New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 1959. In the late 1950s, at the Los Angeles County Art Institute (later renamed the Otis College of Art and Design), Price’s ceramics professor, Peter Voulkos, encouraged the artist to create work that transcended the traditional boundaries of the medium.  

Ken Price Scultpure: A Retrospective is currently on view at the Metropolitan Museum in The Helen and Milton A Kimmelman Gallery, Lila Acheson Wallace Wing. The show will run through September 22, 2013. 

Carol Bove. The White Tubular Glyph. 2012. Powder coated bent steel.
Dimensions variable. Photos by EPW Studio/ Maris Hutchinson. 
Courtesy of the artist, Maccarone New York and David Zwirner New York/London

Carol Bove (b. 1971, Geneva)

Carol Bove is a Swiss-born, American artist, whose exhibition opens this weekend at MoMA. Most recently, this brooklyn-based artist received notoriety for her sculptural installations on the High Line in Manhattan, but she has much more planned for the coming months!  The Equinox will feature seven sculptures by Bove, made specifically for the exhibition at MoMA. According to the press release, “The ensemble, created specifically for The Museum of Modern Art, brings together sculptures that represent Bove’s particular artistic vocabulary, marrying modernist forms like cubes, rectangles, and cylinders with a wide variety of materials—from weighty I-beams and smoothly curved powder-coated steel to organic driftwood, seashells, and peacock feathers.”

Bove has exhibited internationally, in solo exhibitions at The Common Guild in Glasgow, The Palais de Tokyo in Paris, the Blanton Art Museum in Austin, the Kunsthalle in Zurich, the ICA in Boston, and the Kunstverein in Hamburg. She has participated in Documenta 13, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Whitney Biennial, among many other noteworthy group exhibitions. 

The exhibition is organized by Laura Hoptman, Curator, with Margaret Ewing, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art.

Image 1: Chadwick Rantanen
Telescopic Pole (Drive Medical/Grey), 2012
Powdercoated aluminum, plastic, walkerballs
Variable up to 296h x 1.5w in
CRMA1302






Image 2: Chadwick Rantanen
Telescopic Pole (Drive Medical/Grey), 2012
CRMA1302
(detail)






Chadwick Rantanen (b. 1981, Wisconsin)
Los Angeles-based Chadwick Rantanen is well known for his sculptural works involving “walker balls" and telescopic aluminum poles. Rantanen’s work is very cerebral by nature.  When Chadwich Rantanen set out to create these works, his intentions were pure: “to make a work of art that was entirely benign, one that left no physical trace in the space it was exhibited and which could be adapted to the dimensions of any average-sized gallery" (taken from Standard (Oslo)’s Press Release). Each piece combines walker balls and telescopic aluminum poles of matching hues, a choice Rantanen has made to demonstrate the efforts Americans put into individualizing everything. “Walker Balls" are only sold in the United States - and from that, all colors and patterns are available from solid primaries to camouflage and stars & stripes. He sourced as many various colors and patterns or walker balls as were available, and allowed the design of the balls to dictate the color of the aluminum poles, thus creating a relationship and system for the series. 
Chadwick Rantanen’s first solo show in New York ran from May 5 - June 9th at Essex Street.
Image 1: Chadwick Rantanen
Telescopic Pole (Drive Medical/Grey), 2012
Powdercoated aluminum, plastic, walkerballs
Variable up to 296h x 1.5w in
CRMA1302






Image 2: Chadwick Rantanen
Telescopic Pole (Drive Medical/Grey), 2012
CRMA1302
(detail)






Chadwick Rantanen (b. 1981, Wisconsin)
Los Angeles-based Chadwick Rantanen is well known for his sculptural works involving “walker balls" and telescopic aluminum poles. Rantanen’s work is very cerebral by nature.  When Chadwich Rantanen set out to create these works, his intentions were pure: “to make a work of art that was entirely benign, one that left no physical trace in the space it was exhibited and which could be adapted to the dimensions of any average-sized gallery" (taken from Standard (Oslo)’s Press Release). Each piece combines walker balls and telescopic aluminum poles of matching hues, a choice Rantanen has made to demonstrate the efforts Americans put into individualizing everything. “Walker Balls" are only sold in the United States - and from that, all colors and patterns are available from solid primaries to camouflage and stars & stripes. He sourced as many various colors and patterns or walker balls as were available, and allowed the design of the balls to dictate the color of the aluminum poles, thus creating a relationship and system for the series. 
Chadwick Rantanen’s first solo show in New York ran from May 5 - June 9th at Essex Street.
Image 1: Chadwick Rantanen
Telescopic Pole (Drive Medical/Grey), 2012
Powdercoated aluminum, plastic, walkerballs
Variable up to 296h x 1.5w in
CRMA1302
Image 2: Chadwick Rantanen
Telescopic Pole (Drive Medical/Grey), 2012
CRMA1302
(detail)

Chadwick Rantanen (b. 1981, Wisconsin)

Los Angeles-based Chadwick Rantanen is well known for his sculptural works involving “walker balls" and telescopic aluminum poles. Rantanen’s work is very cerebral by nature.  When Chadwich Rantanen set out to create these works, his intentions were pure: “to make a work of art that was entirely benign, one that left no physical trace in the space it was exhibited and which could be adapted to the dimensions of any average-sized gallery" (taken from Standard (Oslo)’s Press Release). Each piece combines walker balls and telescopic aluminum poles of matching hues, a choice Rantanen has made to demonstrate the efforts Americans put into individualizing everything. “Walker Balls" are only sold in the United States - and from that, all colors and patterns are available from solid primaries to camouflage and stars & stripes. He sourced as many various colors and patterns or walker balls as were available, and allowed the design of the balls to dictate the color of the aluminum poles, thus creating a relationship and system for the series. 

Chadwick Rantanen’s first solo show in New York ran from May 5 - June 9th at Essex Street.

Dustin Yellin (b. 1975 Los Angeles, California)

Portrait from the artist’s tumblr (Adam Green in front of Yellin’s work)

Dustin Yellin is a renaissance man who, through many good fortunes, has come to develop quite a reputation in Redhook, Brooklyn. Besides having an incredible direction for his artistic works, Yellin also manages the real estate development for the warehouses he owns and has renovated into multiple nonprofit artist residency programs (including Kidd Yellin and a yet unnamed space on the corners of Pinoneer and King in Redhook) while also starting a new magazine called INTERCOURSE.

Most famous for his layered drawings, Yellin works with both glass and resin to fixate found objects, drawings and oils into his three-dimensional works. Playing with natural and artificial lights, the layered pieces cast shadows on the walls in the gallery, creating unique atmospheres with each piece. When working with resin, the process involves a meticulous repetitive layering of the resin, allowing it to dry, drawing upon each layer, and repeat, until the large full work of art is created. Glass, as a medium, allows for the suspension of drawings between thin layers, similar to that of a microscopic slide. It is clear how the layers and parts develop the whole that is each piece. His works serve to simplify the complications but not erase them. For Yellin, it is that fragmentation of these complicated realities that allows viewers to comprehend the information, understanding the vast systems that may be discouragingly overwhelming otherwise.